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Eyewear

Eyewear

Childrens frames and lenses

You can see many examples of our kid’s frames on our Facebook page.

Modern children’s glasses feature durability and safety features for your peace of mind, and look great too. We stock many ranges of children’s frames so that you can find exactly what your child needs. Some of our frame ranges have a 2 year unconditional warranty, such as Adidas, Nike, and Hello Kitty. This means that whatever the cause of the breakage, you are covered for the first 2 years after initial purchase of the frame. Other ranges such as Miraflex are unbreakable! We also stock a new range for kids called Tomato glasses – incredibly light frames with temples that can be adjusted to fit your child’s ears just right.

What Kids Want in Glasses

Today, many kids want glasses that look just like the glasses their parents or older brothers and sisters wear. Plastic frames in elongated rectangular shapes, small, retro-styled ovals, and even thin titanium frames are all available for today’s small customers. The availability of these fashionable frame styles for kids has them yearning to wear glasses more than ever before.

No matter the style or brand, it’s important for children to feel that they are a part of the frame selection process. Choosing glasses frames they like goes a long way toward getting them to wear their glasses and take good care of them as well.

Durability and safety issues

While kids may want glasses frames with a specific color or brand, parents generally want something that’s going to last.

Look for kid’s frames with features such as spring hinges (which let the frame’s temples bend in both directions) and flexible frame materials (which can withstand accidents such as sitting on frames or over-bending the temples when taking glasses on and off). These durability features reduce your costs over time. Such items that improve a frame’s durability will reduce  your overall costs.

Polycarbonate or Trivex lenses are the best choice for children’s eyewear. These lightweight and very impact-resistant lenses offer the best combination of comfort and safety.

Tips for buying kids eyewear

  1. Lens Thickness

The lens prescription is always the primary consideration in choosing glasses. Before you start looking for the frames, consult with the optometrist and optical staff  about lens considerations.

If the prescription calls for strong lenses that are likely to be thick, it is important to keep the frames as small as possible to reduce the final lens thickness. Also, smaller lenses tend to have fewer aberrations near the edge of the lens than large lenses of the same material and prescription, so there is less risk of blurred or distorted peripheral vision.

  1. Fashion Forward

Whether they are full- or part-time glass wearers, most kids get at least a little teasing about their specs, especially the first time they wear them. So it’s very important that they avoid frames that make them look “uncool.” You also should steer your child away from frames that clearly are objectionable, too expensive or inappropriate.
Just keep in mind that the real object is to get your child to wear the glasses. Extra enticement may be found in ultra cool features like photochromic lenses with tints that darken outdoors, which may help inspire any child to want to wear glasses.

  1. Plastic or Metal?

Children’s frames are made of either plastic or metal. Many manufacturers copy adult styles for children’s frames. Kids may be attracted to these styles because they look more grown-up. It’s not unusual for kids to ask for glasses that look just like Mum’s or Dad’s.

In the past, plastic frames were a better choice for children because they were considered more durable, less likely to be bent or broken, lighter in weight and less expensive. But now manufacturers are making metal frames that incorporate these features as well.

Fun colors and patterns make these new frames particularly appealing.

  1. Proper Bridge Fit

One of the toughest parts about choosing suitable frames for young children is that their noses are not fully developed, so they don’t have a bridge to prevent plastic frames from sliding down. Metal frames, however, usually are made with adjustable nose pads, so they fit everyone’s bridge.

Most manufacturers recognize this difficulty with plastic frames and make their bridges to fit small noses.

Each frame must be evaluated individually to make sure it fits the bridge. If any gaps exist between the bridge of the frame and the bridge of the nose, the weight of the lenses will cause the glasses to slide, no matter how well the frame seems to fit before the lenses are made.

It is important that the glasses stay in place, because kids tend to look right over the tops of the lenses instead of pushing slipping glasses back up where they belong. Our optical staff will judge whether a frame fits properly.

  1. The Right Temple Style

Temples that wrap all the way around the back of the ear help keep glasses from sliding down or dropping off a child’s face completely.

For babies and toddlers, nose pads and cable temples that wrap snugly around ears  are important to hold  glasses in place.  Another option is a strap that goes around the head.

For glasses that go on and off frequently, it is better to have regular, or “skull,” temples that go straight back and then curve gently around the back of the ear.

  1. Spring Hinges

A nice feature to look for is temples with spring hinges. These special hinges allow the temples to flex outward, away from the frames, without causing any damage. Although they sometimes cost a bit more, spring hinges can be a worthwhile investment for children’s eyewear.

Kids are not always careful when they put on and take off glasses, and spring hinges can help prevent the need for frequent adjustments and costly repairs. They also come in handy if the child falls asleep with the glasses on or just has a rough day at play. Spring hinges are strongly recommended for toddlers, who sometimes get carried away playing with their new glasses.

  1. Lens Material

Once you and your child agree on frames that you both like, the next consideration is the lenses.

Children’s lenses come in a variety of materials that vary in quality. As the lens material increases in quality, it becomes thinner, lighter and has stronger coatings to prevent damage and scratching. A good example of higher quality materials are  polycarbonate or a material called Trivex, because these  lightweight materials are significantly more impact-resistant than other lens materials.

In addition to being the safest materials, they also are lighter in weight than regular plastic lenses, a nice advantage for strong prescriptions.

The least desirable material for your child’s lenses is glass. Although it must be treated for impact resistance, glass still shatters when it breaks, and broken glass — even safety glass — is a hazard to the eye. Glass lenses also are significantly heavier, which makes them less comfortable to wear.

  1. Sports Eyewear

Polycarbonate is such a safe lens material that you may be tempted to let your child play sports in his regular glasses.

If your kid is involved in sports, a proper sports goggle with polycarbonate lenses will often provide the best protection against eye injury.

Although it sounds counter-intuitive, a sports goggle should have a larger vertical eye opening, rather than a smaller one. If an impact should occur and the goggles are pushed toward the face, a large eye opening keeps the impact points far above and below the eyes. With a small opening, however, the goggle hits right at the edge of the eye socket, which can damage the globe of the eye.

  1. Warranties

Purchasing glasses for very active or rough chidren, toddlers, or even just first time wearers can strike fear into the hearts of parents when considering the treatment the glasses may go through. So, warranties, in addition to the quality of the glasses,  can give great peace of mind to parents when purchasing glasses for children.

The warranties to look for are

  • Length of the frame manufacturing warranty: 1 year or 2 years?
  • Replacement cost if glasses are lost or damaged beyond repair?
  • Purchasing cost of second pairs as backup or use for school and home?
  • Replacement of screws and nosepads for glasses?
  • Adjustments and maintenance of glasses and
  • Warranties on lens prescriptions?
  1. Backup Pair

Because children can be tough on their eyewear, it’s always a good idea to purchase a second, or backup, pair of glasses for them. This especially is true if your child has a strong prescription and cannot function without his or her glasses.

Special discounts often apply if the backup pair is purchased at the same time as the primary pair. In some cases, sports goggles can be used as a spare pair of glasses. Or, if your child’s prescription has not changed significantly, keep his or her previous glasses in a safe place for use as a spare.

If your child wears glasses full time (including outdoors), photochromic lenses or prescription sunglasses also should be considered to decrease glare, increase visual comfort and provide 100 percent protection from the sun’s harmful UV rays.

Adult eyewear

We think you’ll love our frame ranges! From the classics to the quirky, styles to fit every budget and face. Some of our frame ranges include Oroton, Ogi, Woow, Calvin Klein, Dolce and Gabbana, Ray Ban, Boheme, Nicola Finetti, Coco Song, Pepe Jeans, Anne Klein, Jag, Ted Baker, Lightec, Columbia, Skaga, and so many more.

Tips for buying eyewear

  1. Lens Thickness

The lens prescription is always the primary consideration in choosing glasses. Before you start looking for the frames, consult with the optometrist and optical staff about lens considerations.

If the prescription calls for strong lenses that are likely to be thick, it is important to keep the frames as small as possible to reduce the final lens thickness. Also, smaller lenses tend to have fewer aberrations near the edge of the lens than large lenses of the same material and prescription, so there is less risk of blurred or distorted peripheral vision.

  1. Fashion, Personality and Lifestyle

Because people generally recognize you by your face, the glasses you choose to wear are a very real part of your identity.

Whether you want to appear sophisticated, fun-loving, youthful, conservative or style-conscious, the right eyewear can help you shape how you are perceived. And if you choose to wear only one pair of glasses for everything you do, that says something about you, too!

If you are in a business environment, to help instill trust and confidence among a wide variety of your clients and colleagues, it’s usually best to stay with conservative frame shapes and colours. Consider classic shapes such as ovals, rectangles and almonds, and traditional colours of gunmetal, silver, brown, gray and black.

One way to show your creative, fashion side is with modern shapes, such as geometric designs in thicker and larger plastic frames. Many modern metal frames also can be creative in appearance.

Today’s more fashionable, larger-sized glasses also are an option, as are more unusual colours such as blue, green and purple. Multi-coloured laminates are another possibility, as well as flower patterns and animal prints.

Just as dress shoes are the wrong attire for the gym, your regular 9-to-5 glasses may be the wrong choice for sports and active wear. For the best comfort, performance and safety during “weekend warrior” hours, choose at least one pair of sport sunglasses, sport glasses or even just a more casual, sports-suggestive glasses frame.

Styling can range from wraparounds to more conventionally shaped glasses and sunglasses. Sporty looks can include bright or neon colors, stripes and modern combinations of metal and plastic materials.

Contrary to Popular Belief, One Size Does NOT Fit All. We all like convenience. But the truth is, there are many aspects to your life and personality. And to complement your multi-dimensional lifestyle, you need more than one pair of glasses.

Also, you should consider three main points when choosing a glasses frame for your face shape:

  • Eyewear should repeat your personal best feature (such as a blue frame to match blue eyes).
  • The frame shape should contrast with your face shape.
  • The frame size should be in scale with your face size.
  1. Plastic or Metal?

Glasses frames are made of either plastic or metal. In the past, plastic frames were a better choice because they were considered more durable, less likely to be bent or broken, lighter in weight and less expensive. But now manufacturers are making metal frames that incorporate these features as well. Both metal and plastic frames come in fun colours and patterns.

  1. Proper Bridge Fit

Each frame must be evaluated individually to make sure it fits the bridge. If any gaps exist between the bridge of the frame and the bridge of the nose, the weight of the lenses will cause the glasses to slide, no matter how well the frame seems to fit before the lenses are made.

It is important that the glasses stay in place, otherwise you tend to look right over the tops of the lenses, or keep pushing slipping glasses back up where they belong. Our optical staff will judge whether a frame fits properly.

  1. The Right Temple Style

Temples that curl wrap all the way around the back of the ear help keep glasses from sliding down or dropping off your face completely.

For glasses that go on and off frequently, it is better to have regular, or “skull,” temples that go straight back and then curve gently around the back of the ear.

  1. Spring Hinges

A nice feature to look for is temples with spring hinges. These special hinges allow the temples to flex outward, away from the frames, without causing any damage. Although they sometimes cost a bit more, spring hinges can be a worthwhile investment for longevity of your eyewear.

We are not always careful when we put on and take off glasses, and spring hinges can help prevent the need for frequent adjustments and costly repairs.

  1. Lens Material

Glasses lenses come in a variety of materials that vary in quality. As the lens material increases in quality, it becomes thinner, lighter and has stronger coatings to prevent damage and scratching. A good example of higher quality materials are polycarbonate or a material called Trivex, because these lightweight materials are significantly more impact-resistant than other lens materials.

In addition to being the safest materials, they also are lighter in weight than regular plastic lenses, a nice advantage for strong prescriptions.

The least desirable material is glass. Although it must be treated for impact resistance, glass still shatters when it breaks, and broken glass — even safety glass — is a hazard to the eye. Glass lenses also are significantly heavier, which makes them less comfortable to wear.

  1. Sports and Safety Eyewear

When eye safety is a concern, polycarbonate lenses usually are the best choice for your glasseses, sunglasses and sports eyewear.

Polycarbonate lenses are thinner and lighter than regular plastic lenses. They also offer 100 percent protection from the sun’s harmful UV light and are up to 10 times more impact-resistant than plastic or glass lenses.

Polycarbonate lenses have become the standard for safety glasses, sports goggles and children’s eyewear. Because they are less likely to fracture than regular plastic lenses, polycarbonate lenses also are a good choice for rimless eyewear designs where the lenses are attached to the frame components with drill mountings.

  1. Warranties

Warranties, in addition to the quality of the glasses, can give great peace of mind when purchasing glasses.

The warranties to look for are

  • Length of the frame manufacturing warranty: 1 year or 2 years?
  • Replacement cost if glasses are lost or damaged beyond repair?
  • Purchasing cost of second pairs as backup or use for work and home?
  • Replacement of screws and nosepads for glasses?
  • Adjustments and maintenance of glasses?
  • Warranties on lens prescriptions?
  1. Backup Pair

Because day to day activities can be tough on eyewear, it’s always a good idea to purchase a second, or backup, pair of glasses. This especially is true if you have a strong prescription and cannot function without your glasses.

Special discounts often apply if the backup pair is purchased at the same time as the primary pair. Sunglasses or sports goggles can be used as a spare pair of glasses. Or, if your prescription has not changed significantly, keep your previous glasses in a safe place for use as a spare.

If you wear glasses full time (including outdoors), photochromic lenses or prescription sunglasses also should be considered to decrease glare, increase visual comfort and provide 100 percent protection from the sun’s harmful UV rays.

Lenses

Lens Thickness

“High-index” lenses are the right choice if you want thinner, lighter lenses and glasses that are as attractive and comfortable as possible.

The stronger the prescription, the thicker the edges.

Most of today’s fashionable frames are made of plastic or metal with rims thinner than the lens itself. Also, popular rimless mountings mean that the edges of the lenses are completely exposed. In either case, the lens edges are highly visible, and thicker edges can detract from the appearance of your eyewear.

Regular glass or plastic lenses for high amounts of nearsightedness or farsightedness can be quite thick and heavy. Fortunately, there are  a variety of new “high-index” plastic lens materials that bend light more efficiently. This means less material can be used in high-index lenses to correct the same amount of refractive error, which makes high-index plastic lenses both thinner and lighter than conventional glass or plastic lenses.

Thinner, lighter high-index lenses are especially recommended if you have a strong prescription for nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism.

Advantages of High-Index Lenses

Thinner. Because of their ability to bend light more efficiently, high-index lenses for nearsightedness have thinner edges than lenses with the same prescription power that are made of conventional plastic material.

Lighter. Thinner edges require less lens material, which reduces the overall weight of the lenses. Lenses made of high-index plastic are lighter than the same lenses made in conventional plastic, so they’re more comfortable to wear.

Free-Form Lenses

The most popular type of high-definition lenses are called free-form lenses. The term “free-form” refers to an advanced manufacturing process that reduces higher-order distortions that occur in lenses created with traditional  lens manufacturing tools and processes.

High-definition lenses are designed to provide sharper vision in all conditions and reduced glare for night time driving.

With free-form lenses (also called digital high-definition lenses), the fabrication of the lenses from wearer’s glasses prescription is optimized, to provide the most accurate lens power and the sharpest vision possible.

The result is that high-definition lenses may provide sharper image quality, better peripheral vision, improved contrast  and less glare at night.

Because of the sophisticated technology used to design and fabricate free-form and wavefront lenses and the added time and equipment required to fit them, expect to pay up to 25 to 30 percent more for high-definition glass lenses, compared with conventional lenses of the same material and design.

Though high-definition lenses cost more than conventional glass lenses, many people who try them — particularly wearers who’ve been frustrated by a lack of crisp vision with glasses in the past — find free-form and wavefront lenses produce a noticeable improvement in clarity and comfort

Multifocal/Progressive lenses

Why multifocal lenses? You may be maturing, but “mature” doesn’t have to mean “old.” If you are in your 40s (or older) and are having trouble reading fine print with your glasses, multifocal lenses offer a younger-looking appearance and other advantages over the lined bifocal lenses your parents wore.

Multifocal lenses eliminate the visible lines of traditional bifocals  and hide the fact that you need reading glasses. With multifocal lenses, no one has to know whether you’re wearing glasses just for fashion — or because your arms have “grown too short” for you to see up close.

In addition to cosmetic advantages, progressive multifocal lenses provide a more natural correction of presbyopia  than bifocal lenses.

Instead of having just two or three lens powers like bifocals or trifocals, multifocal lenses are true “multifocal” lenses that provide a seamless progression of many lens powers for all viewing distances.

With multifocal lenses, you can look up to see clearly across the room and in the distance. You also can look ahead to view your computer in the intermediate zone and drop your gaze downward to read and do fine work comfortably through the near zone of the lenses.

And it’s easy to adapt to today’s modern progressive lenses.

Progressive lenses are line-free multifocals that have a seamless progression of added magnifying power for intermediate and near vision.

A “corridor” of optimum lens power runs vertically down each progressive lens. Your optometrist will take careful measurements of your eyes and glass frame in order to place the corridor in just the right location so your eyes can naturally access the various powers within the lens for comfortable viewing at all distances.

And progressive lenses eliminate an annoying problem caused by bifocal and trifocal lenses known as “image jump.”

With conventional bifocals and trifocals, images seem to “jump” as your eyes move past the sharply defined boundary between the distance and near parts of the lens. With progressive lenses, the transition between lens powers within the lens is smooth and seamless, letting you change focus from distance to near and back again more comfortably, with no image jump.

Progressive lenses also are available in a wide variety of materials, including regular plastic, polycarbonate, high-index and photochromic lenses.

 

Our commitment to you – warranties and peace of mind

We will:

  1. Choose your lens based on what is the best lens design and material for your visual needs
  2. Provide you with all cleaning solutions and lens cleaning cloths FREE for the life of your glasses
  3. Provide you with FREE servicing and adjustments for the life of your glasses
  4. Provide you with FREE cases to keep your glasses protected
  5. Use local fitting labs, supporting local industry in Australia
  6. Give your glasses a FREE ultrasonic clean, to make your eyewear look brand new again, after 12 months
  7. Guarantee all our treatments to your satisfaction
  8. Provide you with a FREE second frame for a spare pair, so that you are never without your glasses (conditions apply).

We will NOT:

  1. Give you the option of only one lens brand, based on preferred supplier agreements and profit.
  2. Sell you glasses and then give up on you if you have trouble adjusting to the prescription. You are always welcome back to see us.
  3. Charge you extra for the necessary cleaning materials & cases to keep your glasses in good condition. Replacement nose pads are provided free of charge for frames supplied by us.

Safety eyewear

Eye Injury and Protection

About 95 per cent of all eye injuries treated in Australian hospitals are a result of carelessness and lack of attention to basic eye safety precautions. And most of these avoidable injuries (60%) occur at a workplace.

The vast majority of eye injuries can be avoided by taking a common sense approach to hazardous activities. You should wear eye protection during all potential hazardous tasks around the home and in the work place, even if you are just lending a hand.

There’s a lot more to eye protection than just putting on a pair of safety glasses. There are numerous products available in the market that claim eye safety, but the trick is using the most appropriate safety eyewear for the particular task. By having a good understanding of the different kinds of eye protection, you can make an informed choice and find the solution that is best for you.

Common Causes of Eye Injury:

  • Impact –such as plastic pieces or metal flakes can hit your eye and result in puncture, scratch or bruise
  • Dust – sanding or woodwork can cause dust and grit to fly into your eye, resulting in irritation and scratches
  • Chemical – harmful chemical vapours, mists and fumes, or liquid chemicals splashing into your eyes, can burn the surface of your eye
  • Heat – exposure to high temperatures, molten metal, or hot sparks poses a potential burn hazard
  • Visible Radiation – unprotected exposure to an intense light source such as laser can result in retinal burns and permanent loss of vision
  • Ultraviolet (invisible) radiation – sources of UV radiation such as welding arc can cause burns to the cornea and conjunctiva, cataracts and retinal damage.

Protecting your eyes.

Different situations require different types of protective eyewear. The main types are safety glasses, safety goggles and face shields. Fogging and ill-fitting eyewear can put people off wearing the appropriate protection. You can purchase anti-fogging lenses and anti-fogging lens wipes.

Safety glasses – Safety glasses may look like regular spectacles but the lenses are more durable and provide better protection against flying debris. They may be low impact (no marking) or medium impact (marked with an I). They should also provide side protection. If you have a vision problem, you can use specially made glasses that have corrective lenses.

Safety goggles – Safety goggles fit snugly around your eyes and may offer an extra level of protection above that provided by safety glasses. They may be low or medium impact.

Eye shields – Eye shields cover your upper face and have much the same function as goggles but are less likely to fog. If you wear spectacles, you can wear them beneath the eye shield. They may be low or medium impact.

Face shields – Face shields cover your entire face. Again, you can wear corrective spectacles beneath the face shield. They may be low impact, medium impact or high impact (marked with a V).

Helmets or goggles with special filters are available, which provide an extra level of protection for welders or those who work with lasers.

Safety prescription lenses

When considering prescription safety glasses, it is important to know that one of the most significant parts of safety glasses are the lenses.

lthough polycarbonate is still the most commonly used industry standard lens, Trivex, a new advance in safety lens technology which meets the AS/NZs1337.6:2007, is now being used in more and more cases for improved optics and chemical protection.

  • Improved impact resistance, more than polycarbonate
  • Offer less distortion through the lens, leading to wider fields of view.  Better peripheral vision for  better for situational awareness
  • 10% lighter than polycarbonate
  • Signficantly higher resistance to chemical exposure than polycarbonate
  • Can be tinted for prescription sunglasses up to 80% density tint

Another advance in prescription safety lens technology is the use of  lasers to digitally cut and surface prescription lenses.  These laser cut lenses, called “Free form “ lenses are now being used in more and more cases for improved optics and in safety glasses with high curvature or “wrap”.

  • Lenses are ground, cut and designed with laser instead of standard machine lathes
  • Laser design enables more customization and high definition optics, sharper vision. Any material such as Trivex, and any style of lens such and multifocal or single vision can be made with Freeform laser design.
  • Creates automatically thinner, and therefore lighter more comfortable lenses
  • Widens field of  view and improves peripheral vision  in all frames, in particular  frames with significant “wrap/curvature” , leading to improved situational awareness by reducing blind spots.